Failure culture

Success is most of the time linked to how willing people are to risk and take chances. Usually most people refuse to take chances because they are afraid of failing. And it’s understandable. No one wants to be disappointed, to lose time and resources and end up with nothing, but the most important thing is the fear of social pressure and how others will perceive them.

When talking about different attitudes toward failure the difference between Europe and the US comes to mind. In Europe failure is seen as a major setback in life, a serious problem, even a tragedy.  People will do almost anything to reduce risks, to play it safe, to be sure they are on the right track just to avoid failure. It’s more a culture of not failing than of making it big.

On the other hand, in US failure is just part of everyday life. You go out there, do your best, fail, then get up and try again. People expect you to try. It’s an attitude that encourages you to take chances, to experiment and to try to make it big.

Failure is inevitable when you try to achieve great things. What matters is not if you failed, but how fast you can get up.

Catalin Costea

If I had to describe myself in one word it would be polymath; Renaissance man if I had two. I strongly believe that everything you know will come of use sooner or later and that constantly challenging yourself and continuous learning are the key to success.